Skeletroy’s Rearranged Memories #1

Hey everyone, I’ve been off doing my own thing for a while and haven’t posted much to the site in a while. I started a project called SNES Thrash Remixes which was an offshoot of Adver-tainment, which may or may not see the light of day as season 2 is just too much work. Anyway, I wanted to start posting the songs I’ve done to the site, and so to catch up I’ll be doing two old songs per post, along with two paragraphs for each, reflecting my past memories and more recent thoughts. These aren’t set in stone though, I’m just going to write about whatever comes to mind and hope for the best.

  1. Castlevania – Wicked Child

Original release date: October 1, 2015

Oh, the difference a day makes…or in this case, a year. I was working on a lot of video game cover songs to use as background music in another project, and wanted to start releasing some of them. SNES thrash remixes was conceived as Song of the Month, as I didn’t want to overwhelm myself with working on a huge project. It wasn’t long, however, before I found that doing all the music itself was another huge project inside of the first one. I remember thinking “I sure hope I can keep this pace up”, which seems laughable now. Simple math shows that it would have resulted in a twelve song album each year, and that seemed like a pretty good result to me. That also seems laughable now, as more simple math showed me that I’d probably be at it for the next 30 years if I only released 12 songs a year.

At the time of its release, Wicked Child was the best song that I had put together. At the time of this writing, it’s the only song to have a second version released. I wouldn’t say it’s because this version is bad, it’s more of a case where I hadn’t given it enough time but didn’t have enough experience to realize it. A good song is like a good hot meal, sometimes they need a bit of simmering time at the end to really bring all the flavor out. I hadn’t fully realized the “Castlevania sound” I wanted until a year later, when I did the entire soundtrack to the first game. So basically I redid this one so it wouldn’t stick out compared to the rest of the soundtrack.

  1. Metal Gear Solid 2 theme

Original release date: November 1, 2015

When I was younger and had dreams of being a world famous rock star, I had a binder of notes for ideas about releasing albums. I’ll most likely be revealing the details of a lot of these ideas, as it’s been almost 20 years since I’ve written them. One of those ideas was to first release a fairly standard album that kind of tiptoed around the different sounds that would be attempted later, then to go all out with those later albums. The second would be more of an acoustic style album, the third would be more metal, etc. Granted, it’s not the most marketable strategy when you consider how people as a whole fear change, but I never wanted to be pigeon-holed into repeating the same thing simply because it’s what people want.

This was the mindset I revisited with Song of the Month, albeit on a much smaller scale with the concept applied to individual songs instead of full albums. I went with MGS2 because it was about as different from Wicked Child as I could do at the time. Due to it being so different though, it was quite a challenge to get the final mix just right. This was a real challenge, learning how different sound levels needed to be to sound right as an mp3 compared to it pretty well always sounding right through DS speakers. It took something like 40 tries to get the final mix from my DS to the computer. Unfortunately, this song also suffers from “didn’t find my voice yet” syndrome, and will see an eventual re-release when I do a proper “military metal” album.     

 

Thanks for reading and listening! I released a new song today, and although it’s going to be a while before I get to it in this series, you can check it out here:

Skeletroy’s new album is here!

The Legend of the Musical Ninja is a collection of video game music spanning from 1987-1997, rearranged to sound like they’re all from the same game. Some imaginary SNES game that has a thrash metal soundtrack combined with traditional Japanese instruments like the shamisen and shakuhachi. I also included links to the original version of each song in this post, so that you might be able to appreciate the changes if you’re not familiar with the songs.

Zone 1 – Edo
Legend of the Mystical Ninja, SNES
Konami, 1991
Composed by Kazuhiko Uehara and Harami Ueko
Arranged by Skeletroy Blockbuster

Original version:

Chinatown
Revenge of Shinobi, Genesis
Sega, 1989
Composed by Yuzo Koshiro
Arranged by Skeletroy Blockbuster

Original version:

Daddy Mulk
The Ninja Warriors, Arcade, TurboGrafx-16
Taito, 1987
Composed by Hisayoshi Ogura
Arranged by Skeletroy Blockbuster

Original version:

Overworld
Little Ninja Brothers, NES
Culture Brain, 1989
Arranged by Skeletroy Blockbuster

Original version:

Tong City
Run Saber, SNES
Atlus/Horisoft, 1993
Composed by Hikoshi Hashimoto
Arranged by Skeletroy Blockbuster

Original version:

Dharmanyo
Mystical Ninja Starring Goemon, N64
Konami, 1997
Composed by Shigeru Araki, Yusuke Kato, Saiko Miki, and Yasumasa Kitagawa
Arranged by Skeletroy Blockbuster

Original version:

Momentum
Jackie Chan’s Action Kung Fu, NES, TurboGrafx-16
Hudson Soft/Now Productions, 1990
Composed by Masakatsu Maekawa
Arranged by Skeletroy Blockbuster

Original version:

Go! Getsu Fuma
Getsu Fuuma Den, Famicom
Konami, 1987
Composed by Hidenori Maezawa
Arranged by Skeletroy Blockbuster

Original version:

Best Room
The Ninja Warriors, SNES
Taito/Natsume, 1994
Composed by Hiroyuki Iwatsuki
Arranged by Skeletroy Blockbuster

Original version:

My Lover
Revenge of Shinobi, Genesis
Sega, 1989
Composed by Yuzo Koshiro
Arranged by Skeletroy Blockbuster

Original version:

Thanks for listening! You’re awesome!

The Isometric Perspective #32 – Video Game Cover Musicians

Skeletroy, Grant, and JimmyTR talk about some of their favorite musicans and bands who make music based on video games. NOTE: Episodes 30 and 31 were recorded after this one, so any mentions of “the last episode” refer to episode 29.

Check out this episode

The Isometric Perspective # 27 – Computer Gaming

Skeletroy, Grant, and Jimmy talk about some of their earliest memories about playing video games on computers.

Check out this episode

The Isometric Perspective #26 – The Evolution of Gaming in the 21st Century

Skeletroy, Grant, and Jimmy talk about some of the changes that are occuring in video games, and about how this creates a different experience than previous generations have offered.

Check out this episode

Binaridiculous 01 – Video game input devices – a subjective history

Grant and Jimmy of The Isometric Perspective go FULL NERD in this new, technology-centric, podcast series.  Not wanting to shock our listeners’ systems too much, the first episode is about the evolution of the video game controller.

Check out this episode

The Isometric Perspective #25 – Video Games Based on TV Shows

Skeletroy, Grant, and JimmyTR discuss some of the games that were licensed from television studios, and Skeletroy has a field day talking about Capcom games based on Disney cartoons.

Check out this episode

The Isometric Perspective #21 – TV Shows Based on Video Games

Skeletroy, Grant, and JimmyTR talk about some of the shows that scarred them as children, and Jimmy does impressions of all the Captain N characters.

Check out this episode

The Isometric Perspective #20b – The Cinematic Aspect of Gaming (part 2)

Skeletroy, Grant, JimmyTR, and Graham the Re-Animator finish up their discussion by talking about music, sound design, and reveal some of their favorite cinematic games overall.

The Isometric Perspective #20 – The Cinematic Aspect of Gaming (part 1)

Skeletroy, Grant, JimmyTR, and Graham the Re-Animator discuss how video games bring a cinematic experience to the table. Note: This episode ran a little long, so check back next week for part 2.

The Isometric Perspective #19 – Cost vs. Expectation

Skeletroy, Grant, JimmyTR, and Graham the Re-Animator talk about the (mostly low) prices we pay for gaming, and the expectations we have as a result of it. Also, Jimmy tells a heartwarming story about spitting blood into a bucket…seriously, he does.

When That Ruled The World 1: 11/02/2012

What was Your First Video Game Console Experience?

Jimmy TR & Tom Fyrehart talk about their first experiences with video game consoles, the international video game market, & all things in between!

Theme song – “Happy Ever After” by The Senseless – used with kind permission.

Adver-tainment! : Episode 1

Skeletroy takes a look at some Sega ads, a comic starring Meat Loaf, and shows you how to draw Spider-Man.